CUES SKYBOX BLOG

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Mortgage Success Through Member Education

Credit unions can win over banks in this area. By Nicole Hamilton Credit unions have a unique opportunity to capture new members and market share around home ownership, and a distinct competitive advantage over other institutions to do so. Americans have much of their money in their homes. In fact, 80 percent of home owners have 66 percent of their net worth in the equity on their house, according to the Century Foundation’s white paper: A Tale of Two Recoveries. This makes their home by far their largest investment. Yet the statistics on how much people understand about mortgage concepts are grim. Mortgages are complex, but are often sold simply, with the focus on interest rate and monthly payment. In addition, few home buyers are aware of how much equity they might have in their homes in the future, given different available products and offers, or what the trade-offs are with regard to overall cost of the loan. Mortgage originators need to be concerned with ability to pay, and the qualification standards are high these days, preventing precarious financial commitments that many homeowners found themselves in during the pre-mortgage crash. Banks that originate mortgages are generally focused on mortgage origination […]

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Make Learning Work for Employees and Your CU

Employers play key role in success of employees’ professional development. By Lisa Hochgraf Making learning seem both fun and doable is an important challenge for executives and credit unions alike. The world is constantly changing, so we have to keep learning to keep up. And taking a formal class–like the massive open online course, “Content Strategy for Professionals in Organizations,” that I’m signed up for in April–can seem daunting. But I’m lucky because CUES backs me up. My boss and the organization as a whole knows that I’ll be working extra hard those six weeks to meet publication deadlines and learn all I can from the Northwestern University professors who will be leading the class. The article, “How to Keep Learning and Still Have a Life,” from the November 2014 issue of Harvard Business Review suggests that my feeling of being backed up by my employer is key to success. “Learning efforts can easily fall flat without institutional muscle behind them. Sure, leaders may encourage employees to sign up for extra training and courses—but how many people will find time to engage properly, or at all, if their workloads remain the same and their studying must be done after hours? […]

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The Member Education Piece of Apple Pay

The people you serve may have the same questions I did. By Kelly Schmit Credit unions that implement Apple Pay this year may need to educate their members about this new offering, so they are less nervous and more willing to try it out. I know this because I am one of the members that needed education. I got a bunch last week when I attended CUES’ Apple Pay, MCX & Beyond: Your Mobile Pay Strategy in Dallas. Here are some questions that I, a 33-year-old wife and mother of two, had about this new offering, with answers from the experts that presented at the CUES seminar. You might find that your members have similar concerns. Do you have someone ready to answer them? Can everyone use Apple Pay? Apple Pay can only be used on certain Apple devices, but all smart phones are getting their own cellular payment platform. So don’t worry, no one will be left out of the new payments movement in due time. What happens if my phone gets stolen? Doesn’t that expose all my payment information? The experts from Apple Pay, MCX & Beyond underscored that losing your cell phone is a bummer in terms […]

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‘More’ Foreclosures Predicted Under New Rules

Does your experience match this? By Mary Auestad Arnold Brian Dolan predicts that in many areas of the U.S. the number of foreclosures during the first six months of 2015 will exceed the number during the first six months of 2014. Dolan is an attorney with the credit union group of Kaufman and Canoles, Norfolk, Va. The seventh prediction in the winter 2015 issue of his firm’s “Credit Union Legal Update” explains his thinking: “The new mortgage servicing rules, which took effect in 2014, now prevent the first notice of foreclosure until a member is more than 120 days delinquent. This rule artificially decreased the foreclosure rate during the first half of 2014. The second half of 2014 saw the foreclosure rate increase in comparison to the first half of the year. “Also, as result of the 120-day prohibition, by the time many members now seriously attempt to cure their default, the deficiency has become so large that they cannot secure the necessary funds,” the article continues. “Thus, we predict the foreclosure rate during the first half of 2015 may be closer to the rate in 2013 than the rate in 2014.” What do you think of this? Are you […]

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Substitute Mindfulness for Multi-Tasking

3 tips for the workplace. By Romie Mushtaq, M.D. Google, eBay, Intel and General Mills offer classes on it. So do Harvard Business School, Ross School of Business and Claremont Graduate University, among other campuses. Mindfulness–being focused and fully present in the here and now–is not just a corporate trend, but a proven method for success, both for individuals and for businesses. Even if a company doesn’t make it part of the culture, employees and managers can substitute their multi-tasking habits with mindfulness to reduce stress and increase productivity. The result that you and your colleagues will notice is that you’re sharper, more efficient and more creative. Many scientific and medical studies have documented that practicing mindfulness, whether it’s simply taking deep breaths, or actually meditating or doing yoga, has been shown to alter the structure and function of the brain, which is what allows us to learn, acquire new abilities, and improve memory. Advances in neuroimaging techniques have taught us how these mindfulness-based techniques affect neuroplasticity, or the brain’s ability to change in function or structure based on new experience. Multi-tasking, on the other hand, depresses the brain’s memory and analytical functions, and reduces blood flow to the part […]

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Get a Good Strategy for Your CU

By Kelly Schmit Volunteers are expected to be involved in a credit union’s strategy development and prescribe a course into the future, John Oliver, president of Laurel Management Systems, Inc., told CUES’ Directors Conference attendees last month. But what is strategy, exactly? According to Oliver, it’s not financial and business planning, but understanding the needs of the marketplace and how your credit union will meet them. A strategy is the purpose or the message of your credit union—where your credit union is going and why, Oliver explained. “As volunteers, you are responsible for giving your employees and members a purpose to follow,” he said. “Be passionate about why your credit is here with a guiding principle, and make sure everyone knows their role. “We are a very over-banked society and you need to meet your market’s needs through strategic leadership—which involves the application of the most simple economic theory, the allocation of limited resources or ‘deciding what to do and not do,’” he explained. According to Oliver, strategy development starts with holding the current business model up to scrutiny: Understand your value proposition before you question its sustainability. Understand your culture. Research, research, research and base decisions on hard data. […]

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Creating a Culture of Innovation

Know why you do the things you do–and support staff in doing them. By Kelly Schmit As an employee of CUES, I really related to what former Trader Joe’s CEO Doug Rauch said during our Directors Conference in December. Two points from his presentation rang especially clear: 1) innovation is needed for a business to succeed, and 2) the right culture is needed for innovation to take place. About a year ago, CUES went through the rebranding process, a major change. We wanted to create a culture of innovation; put ideas into action; and deliver valuable events, products and services to our market. Rauch told all of us at Directors Conference: “To create a culture of innovation, you have to start with why you exist as a business. Often we know what we do and how we do it, but sometimes we forget why we do it; and the why is the most critical part. Great businesses don’t simply try to maximize their bottom line, but return to their purpose.” As part of its rebranding process, CUES took a hard look at its mission and vision statements (read them here), what we were and what we wanted to become. Building […]

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Apple Pay, EMV and Retailer Breach Prevention

Could these new developments have helped avoid the Target compromise? By Michelle Thornton Perhaps the most common security question asked about Apple Pay’s tokenization technology and EMV (“chip”) cards is whether they could have prevented the Target breach, the first anniversary of which the industry just marked during the 2014 holiday shopping season. The short answer is no, but let’s look at what these security technologies can do. EMV—which secures card-based transactions, using a specialized computer chip housed right in the plastic—couldn’t have prevented the breach itself. But it could have prevented compromised numbers from being used to create counterfeit cards. EMV cards are difficult to reproduce, so fraudsters typically don’t attempt it. Tokenization—which removes the credit card number from an online, mobile or contactless point-of-sale transaction and replaces it with a randomly generated number–couldn’t have prevented the breach, either. But any tokenized numbers would have been worthless to the fraudsters. Tokenized numbers (at least in Apple Pay) are tied to a specific device (aka phone). So if the fraudsters got the number and tried to use it, the transaction would fail because the unique elements of that device would not be present in the transaction. Behind the scenes, the […]

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Boost Service in 3 Areas in 2015

Checking without overdraft fees, card security and access to liquidity. By Bob Giltner Credit unions take great pride in their service to members, so it may be surprising to hear that many CUs are, unintentionally, underserving their members. Based on member demand, credit unions should be providing additional services in three areas: a checking account without overdraft fees, a secure debit card and easy online access to liquidity. No-Overdraft-Fee Checking Currently, few or no U.S. credit unions offer checking accounts without overdraft fees. Meanwhile, Wal-Mart, prepaid cards and neo-banks like Simple make a living by promoting checking accounts without such fees. Some argue all accounts have no overdraft fees if members just balance their checkbooks, and that overdraft services protect members from merchant return check charges. Yet such a perspective misses the changes in member needs and the marketplace. Millennials, those aged 18 to 35, now comprise the largest age segment in the nation, and they are clearly opting for non-bank payment providers, as shown in the recent Viacom report, “The Millennial Disruption Index,” which surveyed 10,000 people within this age group. Roughly three quarters of those surveyed felt better about transaction services with Amazon, Google, PayPal or Square than […]

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The Rise of the Multi-Screeners

Offering a consistent and personal experience across devices will increase CUs’ appeal. By Stephen Bohanon A Google study titled, “The New Multi-screen World: Understanding Cross-platform Consumer Behavior,” reported that “we are a nation of multi-screeners,” where the large majority (90 percent) of our media interactions are screen based. The report also indicated that consumers tend to either move from device to device or use multiple devices at the same time, moving seamlessly between them throughout the day. Managing finances is a top activity performed when consumers are sequentially screening between devices, according to the study. In fact, smartphones tend to be the most common starting place for banking activities (59 percent). Fifty-six percent then continue on through a PC or laptop, followed by 3 percent on a tablet. It is clear consumers are quickly changing the way they bank. According to Pew Research, device ownership continues to evolve with smartphones and tablets gaining. As of January 2014, over half (58 percent) of American adults owned a smartphone and 42 percent owned a tablet. Meanwhile, “dumb” phones are declining. Consequently, device usage is also evolving. Pew Research found that website visits through tablets and smartphones each increased by 50 percent in […]

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TILA-RESPA Deadline Countdown

CUs face big mortgage documentation decisions before Aug. 1, 2015. By John Levy The close of another year naturally causes most people to think about the year ahead. For our industry, it is a time to ponder such questions as, what will be the defining trends? What will be next year’s biggest stories? What do we face as our primary compliance challenges? This last question might be bringing most credit unions to a screeching halt. Not that managing burgeoning regulatory changes is anything new to today’s executives, but there are some fairly serious deadlines looming. Realize it or not, we are less than a year from the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rule issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, with a go-live date of Aug. 1, 2015. The new rule is meant to make the information on mortgage disclosures easier for consumers to understand by consolidating forms required under the Truth in Lending Act and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, as well as eliminating miscellany data. The TILA-RESPA rule is meant to create a friendlier borrower atmosphere. For instance, two new documents—the loan estimate and the closing disclosure–will consolidate several other forms previously used, simplifying the consumer’s experience. Also, it […]

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How to Stay ‘Top of Wallet’ in the Apple Pay Era

Manage fraud risk, look at e-delivery and know how to serve Millennials. By Fredda McDonald Look back at 2014 for ideas on how to prepare for the new year to come: A year of high-profile data breaches kept security top of mind for consumers; the launch of Apple Pay and the looming 2015 EMV security-chip deadline defined payments; and both a digital payments revolution and a “Millennial shift” are well underway. Given these trends, how should credit unions prepare to stay competitive in 2015 and beyond? The Year of the Breach 2014 started with the effects of Target’s high-profile data breach being felt in full force, rocking consumer confidence to the core. That was followed by the Home Depot breach and a dozen more widespread fraud and security issues that dominated the conversation for much of 2014. These events increased the pressure on credit unions to be at the top of their game; they demand CUs lead the way in security. The good news is that credit unions are well-positioned to do so; they also recorded an all-time high in member satisfaction in 2014. More than ever before, it’s imperative that credit unions can play minute-by-minute defense for members, as […]

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Apple Pay and EMV Security

Tokenization and smart cards create a one-two punch to protect member transactions. By Michelle Thornton CUs are rightfully excited about the tokenization security process that underpins the much-talked-about Apple Pay. However, as CUs start to leverage tokenization, they can’t afford to ignore EMV (“chip”) cards, heralded as a huge leap in card security as they made a bigger foray into the U.S. market this year. In simple terms, tokenization enhances security on cardless transactions in mobile and online commerce, as well as at the contactless point of sale. (It does so by removing the credit card number from a transaction and replacing it with a randomly generated number.) In contrast, EMV secures card-based transactions, using a specialized computer chip housed right in the plastic. It’s possible to become confused because EMV and tokenization are often talked about in the same breath. They both use cryptography, and are both fraud prevention tools. As a result of the confusion, some credit unions might wonder if having tokenization makes having an EMV strategy and adoption irrelevant. It doesn’t. Each technology is brilliant at what it does. And each one is less brilliant at standing in for the other. In fact, choosing between tokenization […]

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Absolute Honesty

Six laws to promote a corporate culture of integrity. By Kelly Schmit Truer words have never been spoken… “Raise your hand if you have taught your children not to lie,” Larry Johnson asked the audience at CUES’ Directors Conference this week. Over 400 hands reached for the sky. “Raise your hand if you have ever told a lie,” followed up Johnson, co-author of Absolute Honesty: Building a Corporate Culture That Values Straight Talk and Rewards Integrity. Again, over 400 arms went into the air. So, where is the disconnect? How can we say one thing, but practice the complete opposite? More importantly, how can we build a corporate culture that values straight talk and rewards integrity when we are all less than stellar at always telling the truth? At Directors Conference, Johnson presented “Six Laws of Absolute Honesty.” Law #1: Tell the truth. We know everyone tells white lies from time to time. The problem is, individuals have different opinions about when the total truth should be told. When Johnson asked the audience, “What is your criteria for not telling a white lie?” several answers came back, including: if the consequence is worse than the lie if it is for […]

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Your ‘Campfire’ Story Counts

Know the power of the leader’s voice. By Michael Hudson, Ph.D. OK, I confess. During Tom Flick’s keynote presentation at last month’s CEO/Executive Team Network, I found myself daydreaming. Not exactly a desired behavior from one who would be leading a coaching session on the topic immediately following the speech, but it happened nonetheless. Here’s why… A former NFL quarterback turned motivational speaker, Flick spoke about the power of the leader’s voice–how words create pictures that create emotions that create attitudes that create behaviors that create habits that create reality. As he did so, my mind wandered to the time when I learned just what that meant—something I didn’t fully understand until hearing his insights. When I was 12 years old, my 4-H friends (finally) convinced me to attend state camp. They had tried for the previous couple of years, but frankly I didn’t get the appeal. Maybe that’s because my aunt and uncle lived at the camp year round and to me it was just a place that I went once in awhile to see family. So the idea of attending a full week of camp there certainly didn’t seem all that appealing. But that changed during the opening […]

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When Building a Sandcastle, You Can’t Beat the Ocean

Make sure you’re doing enough great work. By Michael Hudson, Ph.D. During his keynote presentation at CEO/Executive Team Network last month, Michael Bungay Stanier shared some very important and valuable ideas about work. Specifically, he challenged the audience to think about how much bad work, good work, and great work they were doing. Senior partner of Box of Crayons and author of Do More Great Work, Stanier reminded attendees that 90 percent of what we do is subconscious and that 50 percent is routine, and offered these key definitions: Bad Work — best depicted by the acronym WOMBAT—that is Waste Of Money, Bandwidth, And Time. Good Work — work within your job description that there is typically more of than you can actually do and that is fueled by false urgency (as if you are trying to beat the ocean while building a sandcastle). Great Work — working this category is about staying ahead of the curve. It is strategic, innovative and makes a difference. Using these definitions, Stanier challenged the audience to complete this very simple exercise: 1. Draw a large circle on a blank piece of paper. 2. Divide the circle into sections representing the percentage of time […]

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If You Give a Future Leader a Cookie …

You might unite and ignite the CU movement. By Dana Murn-Kohal Remember the children’s book If You Give a Mouse a Cookie? In that story, giving the mouse a cookie sets off a chain of events that eventually leads back to giving the mouse another cookie. What if you gave a future leader a cookie—in the form of your support or mentorship? What chain of events would you start? It could become a beautiful story to tell your children. Many of the “future leaders” of our movement are Millennials like me. And wow, everyone is talking about us these days—whether it is about how we have been taught to expect praise in every aspect of our lives or that we cannot save a dollar to save our souls. Despite all of the white noise and generic classifications, most of us care about causes passionately, and that can be to credit unions’ advantage. At CU Water Cooler Symposium, which I “crashed” back in September with a great group of eight others, it was evident in every conversation that we (several of us Millennials) had passion for the credit union movement. This made me puzzled. We have an industry full of awesome […]

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Cooperatives or FIs in the Eyes of Gen Y?

Staff service and physical location factor in. By Dana Murn-Kohal At CU Water Cooler Symposium the second week of September in Austin, Texas, a widely discussed topic was the identity crisis that the credit unions are facing: Are they cooperatives or financial institutions? And, can something be gained by promoting themselves as one vs. the other? While no single answer to that question emerged at the event, I came to believe that demonstrating the seven cooperative principles is truly a way CUs can differentiate themselves to members of my Gen Y generation. As part of my CU Water Cooler Symposium experience, I visited the world’s first cooperatively owned and worker-managed brew pub, Black Star Co-op Pub and Brewery. It was interesting to experience a different type of cooperative in action and then reflect back on credit unions. For example, when we walked into Black Star, the guy behind the bar greeted us warmly and let us know our options, such as where we could sit, and what we could order. “Information and education” is cooperative principle No. 5. What a great way to start–with no confusion or fear. Many credit unions now have a front-door greeter and I commend those […]

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How to Get a Handle on Capital and Compliance

By Moisette (Tonya) Sweat Know–and focus on–your membership. The membership is the lifeblood of any credit union. Therefore, it is the key to a credit union’s management of its capital and its regulatory compliance program. In the aftermath of the nation’s recent economic woes, credit unions now face the potential for new capital demands and plenty of other forms of increased regulation. More specifically, the National Credit Union Administration is working to “modernize” CU risk-based capital regulations. As financial institutions that must base their net worth on retained earnings raised from member deposits, credit unions can find these capital requirements daunting. Plus, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is revising regulations formerly issued by the Federal Reserve Board, adding increased disclosure or reporting requirements. Knowing a credit union’s own, unique membership is the key to overcoming the burden of regulation, including the coming impact of a new capital rule. Every credit union should know who its current members are; who its potential members are (or at least where to find them); and the products and services its members need, want, or use most. By knowing its members really well, a credit union can determine the social and financial behaviors most prevalent […]

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Go Tell It on the Mountain

How to talk up credit unions so more people buy in—and benefit. By Heidi Overman The most viable financial model in America today is the cooperative credit union system. So why isn’t the good news of credit union philosophy resonating with American consumers? How can your credit union best trumpet its story—and in doing so, boost credit unions as a movement? Alix Patterson’s preconference workshop before the opening of Directors Conference in December will help participants answer these questions. An expert with data and the use of storytelling, Patterson is chief operating officer of Callahan and Associates, Washington, D.C. Think about it. The credit union movement stands out because it operates solely to serve its members. There are no shareholders pushing for higher returns at the expense of patrons. The board of directors is composed of members. The institution’s products and services are chosen because they benefit the members. And members are not just members; they’re also owners, each one having one vote in the cooperative.They’re a great option for consumers. Yet credit unions as an industry have just 15 percent of auto loans and less than 10 percent of consumer deposits. Despite misdeeds in the mortgage market resulting in […]

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Reaching Millennials: 10 Ways That Work

What CUs can learn from CO-OP Financial Services’ ‘Empowering People’ campaign. By Samantha Paxson In May, CO-OP Financial Services launched “Empowering People, Amplifying Dreams,” a national consumer campaign to promote the advantages of credit unions to Millennials. The campaign has rapidly gained traction with more than 100,000 visits to our website. As we have told the credit union story to younger consumers, we’ve learned at least 10 lessons credit unions can apply as they also reach out to Millennials: 1. Don’t be afraid to get out of your comfort zone. Servicing our own marketing needs is a huge task, but we see that our future success lies at least partially in tackling an industry-wide issue. 2. Make it fun. We launched the campaign in New Orleans in conjunction with our annual conference. We marched to the House of Blues, where we heard a concert by our campaign spokesperson, a 23-year-old singer/songwriter named Daria Musk. Her fan-friendly concerts remain a part of our effort. 3. Be social. From our campaign website, visitors can access campaign videos and information on You Tube, Twitter and Tumbler. All three take the visitor to sites titled “Innovative Banking,” where young consumers can learn more about […]

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Why Your Work Should Include Elephant Topiaries

And fewer WOMBATs. By Mary Arnold According to Michael Bungay Stanier, there are three kinds of work: bad, good and great. Needless to say, we should try to minimize bad work because it is unproductive, wasting money, bandwidth and time (WOMBAT). Senior Partner in Box of Crayons, Toronto, and author of Do More Great Work, Stanier advised his CEO/Executive Team Network audience to hunt down and eliminate WOMBATs. “Good work,” he continued, “is being productive, getting things done, helping reach your credit union’s goals. But there are a couple flaws to good work. “The first is that when you’re doing good work, your brain funnels into the unconscious part of your brain, keeping you stuck in a comfortable rut” rather than out pursuing great work. The other challenge with good work is that no matter how hard you try, you’ll never get ahead of it. In fact, Stanier explained with great exaggeration, “You might say, ‘If I could just get a little more efficient, if I could get on top of my good work,’” I could get to the great work. “But even if you get into work at 1 a.m., delete emails back to 1982, delegate tasks, put in […]

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Identify Your ‘Reluctant’ Leaders

5 characteristics to look for. By Walt Grassl Do you know someone who is very comfortable doing a job that has no leadership dimension, even though you just know they will thrive as a leader? Many of them have a condition that is sometimes referred to as “altitude sickness.” This is not the medical condition that occurs when you are at high altitudes and cannot get enough oxygen. This altitude sickness refers to the fear of success, of reaching great heights. Interestingly, reluctant leaders are often the best leaders. This is because they lead from a desire to serve, not a desire for power. The following are five signs to identify reluctant leaders: 1. Peers seek their counsel. Most organizations have two kinds of leaders: People with leader in their title and people who are sought out for advice by their peers. When looking for reluctant leaders, observe your teams. Who do the team members respect? Who do they go to before bringing problems to the attention to management? 2. They are focused on team success, not individual glory. Some employees are too busy focusing on their tasks to help others with theirs. Others realize that if one employee is […]

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Innovate in ‘Small Sprints’

By Mary Arnold Why is innovation so hard? “We want to do the 100 percent,” meaning the new product can’t be released until it does everything it could possibly do, explained John Best, founder of Best Innovation Group, Land o Lakes, Fla., in his CEO/Executive Team Network session, “Fostering Innovation: Starting a Startup Within Your Credit Union.” “And if it fails, then we’re loathe to try again.” Instead of embarking on marathon development projects, Best suggested working in “small sprints.” Think about the apps you use, he said. “Apps have little tiny changes all the time. Their developers ask, ‘what can we do in x amount of time for the next release?’” They practice “continuous improvement and continuous delivery. How do we master that?” Best recommended these steps: Figure out what you are trying to do (what problem you want to solve, what service you want to offer). Make the innovation as lean as possible. Be ruthless about scope creep to create the “‘minimum viable product’ that can then be incrementally enhanced.” Release it quickly. Measure results from the rollout. Build the “real thing” based on feedback. To illustrate how this has worked in a credit union, Best talked about […]

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Perfect Your Pitch

Tweak small things to get your message across more effectively. By Lisa Hochgraf G. Richard Shell told attendees of the first-ever summer CEO Institute I: Strategic Planning that they could “exercise conscious controls” to make themselves more effective. “Small adjustments and bits of self awareness about how you handle other people is precious,” emphasized Shell, J.D., professor of legal studies and business ethics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, where the institute was held. “Learning more about this stuff can make you better at practicing it. You can talk all you want about charisma, but these are things you can get better at.” Shell offered small things executives can do to be more effective when pitching their ideas. This process has been documented to be effective, and was first conceived by Aristotle. “This is nothing new,” he said. But it works. 1. Define the problem in terms the other party can understand and relate to. “Everyone first wants to know and has to process what the problem is,” he said. Is this issue a market share problem, a morale problem or an employee retention problem? Define it in terms everyone can understand and buy into, he advised, especially […]

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