CUES SKYBOX BLOG

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4 Steps to Becoming a Core-Focused Leader

It’s a natural motivator to know who you are. By Theresa Witham To be successful as a leader, you need to be focused. To be focused, you need to know who you are at your core, said Doug Nielson, CSP, MSW, LCSW, author, performance interventionist, coach and psychotherapist, at CUES Symposium: A CEO/Chairman Exchange earlier this month. “At the center of your being you have the answer; you know who you are and you know what you want,” he said. If your core doesn’t immediately show itself, the following exercise from Nielson will help. There are four value components of your core, Nielson said. Become: In one word, who would you like to become? Write a core statement around that word. Then think of actions that will help you achieve it and when you need to complete them by. Experience: What experiences would you have in your role in the next 90 days? Again, think of one word for the experiences; then write a statement based on that word and define the actions you need to take. Contributions: What contribution would you like to make? How would you like to contribute in the next 90 days? Follow as above with […]

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Leadership and the Next Generation of CEOs

Collaboration and values-based credit unions are at stake. By Henry Wirz I just returned from the Western States Summit Round Table, founded many years ago by Stan Hollen, Rudy Hanley, Ed Callahan and Gary Oakland. These former credit union CEOs, all retired now or in other roles, were part of my generation of CEOs. The question I ask myself over and over is who will assume the kind of leadership that they and others of our generation brought to their credit unions and the credit union system in general. Many CEOs at the recent round tables are of the next generation, and it is too soon to see if they will be great leaders, too. The last generation of CEOs created the modern credit union with professional management, they developed the CUSOs (CUDL, CO-OP, PSCU, CSCU, MBL, etc.) and they played a great role in political advocacy and regulatory advocacy, possibly saving credit unions with HR 1151. What made CEOs like Stan Hollen, Rudy Hanley, Ed Callahan and Gary Oakland effective is that they were doers, thinkers and advocates. I have attended many round tables and what I recall is that our generation of CEOs used the round tables to […]

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The iPhone Effect

What do all these smartphones mean for branch delivery? By Suzi McNicholas It is clear that now, more than ever, today’s consumers are heavily influenced by technology that is simple, cool and connected. Take for instance the smartphone. This device has completely pervaded consumers’ everyday lives, and now credit union members expect similar technologies to accompany more and more of their daily tasks, especially when it comes to banking. This so-called “iPhone effect” has encouraged many credit unions to give an enormous amount of time and resources to expanding their online and mobile banking offerings. Rightly so. However, even though foot traffic in retail branch locations has decreased, the branch still remains the No. 1 sales and member engagement channel among credit unions across the country. While digital channels are critical to meeting members’ transactional needs, the physical branch is still a key component of engaging with members face to face. Contrary to popular belief, consumers still value human interaction when it comes to their personal finances. But now CUs must find a way to service tech-savvy members who demand a better in-branch experience. IDC Financial Insights predicts branch transformation will be an area of major investment over the next […]

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Creativity vs. Career

The distinction is valuable. By Lisa Hochgraf My New Year’s resolution is to read more for pleasure. And wouldn’t you know it, my first pleasure read of 2015 inspired two work-related blog posts (this one and “Fifteen Years to Famous,” which published last Wednesday). The first book I read this year was Yes, Please! by comedienne Amy Poehler, famous from her time on “Saturday Night Live” and “Parks and Recreation.” (Poehler would be proud of me for writing two posts referencing her book, I think. The back cover says, “As a reader of Yes Please I hereby swear to purchase book and read it. … All parties agree to discuss book with family and friends and purchase multiple copies if so inclined. … ” But I digress.) I thought what Poehler had to say about the different between career and creativity was worth talking about: “Creativity is connected to your passion, that light inside you that drives you,” she writes. “That joy that comes when you do something you love. That small voice that tells you, ‘I like this. Do this again. You are good at it. Keep going.’” The parts of my work that fit Poehler’s creativity bill include […]

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Retailers Reduce CU Debit Interchange Income

Alert CUES members note that Walmart, others now exercising their processing choice for small transactions. By Karen Bankston You may be noticing the latest impact of the Durbin Amendment to the Dodd-Frank Act on your credit union’s interchange fees. It appears Walmart and some other large retailers have begun processing signature debit transactions as “PINless PIN” transactions, thus reducing interchange fees—and credit union revenue—even when members opt to sign on the signature pad. The giant chain may be at the head of the pack of merchants aiming to reduce card processing expenses by adjusting the routing logic on their point-of-sale terminals to submit debit charges of $50 or less as PIN transactions whether consumers key in a code or sign for their purchases. “Merchants are beginning to exercise their new transaction routing freedoms, made possible through the Durbin Amendment, which gives retailers the option to do network routing as they see fit,” says Ryan Rackley, director with CUES Supplier member and strategic provider Cornerstone Advisors, Scottsdale, Ariz. The PIN networks, such as STAR and Pulse, introduced a PINless debit option for low-risk transactions in certain categories, including retail purchases, a few years back, Rackley notes. With their small-ticket sales, fast-food […]

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Fifteen Years to Famous

Great jobs sometimes come after a lot of hard work. By Lisa Hochgraf Last week my 11-year-old was worried about what job he would have in the future. In addition to telling him that he had some time to figure things out, I  suggested that typical career paths are a bit more windy than just deciding on a career and then making it happen. Over the holidays, I read Yes, Please! by comedienne Amy Poehler, famous from her time on “Saturday Night Live” and “Parks and Recreation.” In the book, Poehler underscores the idea that careers aren’t made in a moment, but rather from hard work and experiences along the way. “Good or bad, the reality is most people become ‘famous’ or get ‘great jobs’ after a very, very long tenure shoveling sh** and not because they handed their script to someone on the street [who’s famous and could help them],” she writes. “People still think they will be discovered in the malt shop, even though no one can tell you what a malt is anymore. “Everyone wants to believe they will be the regular guy from Sioux City who becomes a reluctant movie star despite his best attempts to […]

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5 ‘Youtility’ Ideas for CUs

CUES Symposium attendees brainstormed ways CUs can be useful to members online. By Theresa Witham Being useful (rather than just selling) is a key way to establish a positive social media presence, according to Jay Baer, marketing strategist, best-selling author and president of Convince & Convert. During his session at CUES Symposium: A CEO/Chairman Exchange last week, attendees had a chance to brainstorm “Youtility” (the title of Baer’s book) ideas for credit unions. They came up with fantastic ideas! Here are five: Custom ATM messages: Program ATMs to display messages related to life such as “Don’t forget to floss,” “Call your mother,” or “Don’t forget to vote.” Welcome to Life Basket: Work with a local hospital to celebrate births. Open memberships for each new baby and provide the mother a basket of items she’ll need for the first week at home. Repair and Maintenance Program: With home repairs, new roofs, car repairs, etc., credit unions have a vested interest in what’s being repaired. The CU would become a sort of Angie’s List where it could recommend local companies. And if something goes wrong with the repair, the CU could step in as a mediator. Wellness Hub: The credit union is […]

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Is Your Marketing Useful?

CUES Symposium speaker offers insight. By Theresa Witham Online, we have an overwhelming amount of competition for our attention, said Jay Baer, marketing strategist, best-selling author and president of Convince & Convert, speaking at CUES Symposium: A CEO/Chairman Exchange on Monday. He shared some examples from his personal Facebook feed and it looked something like: picture of a friend’s cute kid, post from a company that he follows, post from his wife, another post from a company. “Yours looks exactly the same and so does the Facebook feed of every single member and nonmember,” he said. The same goes for Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. It’s a combination of personal and commercial relationships. As a brand on social media, “are you more interesting to me than my wife?” he joked. Probably (hopefully!) not. And on the day after Sunday night’s big game, Baer said: “We’re all competing with Katy Perry and the Super Bowl.” So what should you do about this? How does a credit union shine through posts about the halftime show and someone’s adorable nephew? “Stop trying to be amazing and just start being useful,” he said. It’s a concept Baer calls Youtility (and it’s the title of his […]

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This Innovation Got My Mojo Running

Reimagined grocery checkout has lessons for CUs. By Christopher Stevenson For many in Wisconsin and Illinois, a trip to Woodman’s Markets, an employee-owned grocery chain, is a weekly ritual. For the uninitiated, Woodman’s stores are huge and offer a variety of foods not available at most other grocery stores at terrific prices. In a typical week, I can save upwards of 50 dollars on my food purchases by making the 20-minute trek to my local Woodman’s. That’s reason enough for me to love it. That said, a trip to Woodman’s has its challenges. The stores are huge and until you learn where things are, a simple trip to the store can be time consuming and frustrating. It’s swamped on weekends when people are stocking up for the week. Packer game days? Don’t bother. Pre-game, the store is packed to the gills with people in green and gold jerseys trying to cram in their shopping between church and kick-off. If you venture in after kick-off, the store looks like a swarm of locusts has swept through, leaving behind a few wilted leaves of lettuce and a couple Cheerios. Still, these challenges can be overcome once you develop your “Woodman’s Mojo.” After […]

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Mortgage Success Through Member Education

Credit unions can win over banks in this area. By Nicole Hamilton Credit unions have a unique opportunity to capture new members and market share around home ownership, and a distinct competitive advantage over other institutions to do so. Americans have much of their money in their homes. In fact, 80 percent of home owners have 66 percent of their net worth in the equity on their house, according to the Century Foundation’s white paper: A Tale of Two Recoveries. This makes their home by far their largest investment. Yet the statistics on how much people understand about mortgage concepts are grim. Mortgages are complex, but are often sold simply, with the focus on interest rate and monthly payment. In addition, few home buyers are aware of how much equity they might have in their homes in the future, given different available products and offers, or what the trade-offs are with regard to overall cost of the loan. Mortgage originators need to be concerned with ability to pay, and the qualification standards are high these days, preventing precarious financial commitments that many homeowners found themselves in during the pre-mortgage crash. Banks that originate mortgages are generally focused on mortgage origination […]

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Make Learning Work for Employees and Your CU

Employers play key role in success of employees’ professional development. By Lisa Hochgraf Making learning seem both fun and doable is an important challenge for executives and credit unions alike. The world is constantly changing, so we have to keep learning to keep up. And taking a formal class–like the massive open online course, “Content Strategy for Professionals in Organizations,” that I’m signed up for in April–can seem daunting. But I’m lucky because CUES backs me up. My boss and the organization as a whole knows that I’ll be working extra hard those six weeks to meet publication deadlines and learn all I can from the Northwestern University professors who will be leading the class. The article, “How to Keep Learning and Still Have a Life,” from the November 2014 issue of Harvard Business Review suggests that my feeling of being backed up by my employer is key to success. “Learning efforts can easily fall flat without institutional muscle behind them. Sure, leaders may encourage employees to sign up for extra training and courses—but how many people will find time to engage properly, or at all, if their workloads remain the same and their studying must be done after hours? […]

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The Member Education Piece of Apple Pay

The people you serve may have the same questions I did. By Kelly Schmit Credit unions that implement Apple Pay this year may need to educate their members about this new offering, so they are less nervous and more willing to try it out. I know this because I am one of the members that needed education. I got a bunch last week when I attended CUES’ Apple Pay, MCX & Beyond: Your Mobile Pay Strategy in Dallas. Here are some questions that I, a 33-year-old wife and mother of two, had about this new offering, with answers from the experts that presented at the CUES seminar. You might find that your members have similar concerns. Do you have someone ready to answer them? Can everyone use Apple Pay? Apple Pay can only be used on certain Apple devices, but all smart phones are getting their own cellular payment platform. So don’t worry, no one will be left out of the new payments movement in due time. What happens if my phone gets stolen? Doesn’t that expose all my payment information? The experts from Apple Pay, MCX & Beyond underscored that losing your cell phone is a bummer in terms […]

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‘More’ Foreclosures Predicted Under New Rules

Does your experience match this? By Mary Auestad Arnold Brian Dolan predicts that in many areas of the U.S. the number of foreclosures during the first six months of 2015 will exceed the number during the first six months of 2014. Dolan is an attorney with the credit union group of Kaufman and Canoles, Norfolk, Va. The seventh prediction in the winter 2015 issue of his firm’s “Credit Union Legal Update” explains his thinking: “The new mortgage servicing rules, which took effect in 2014, now prevent the first notice of foreclosure until a member is more than 120 days delinquent. This rule artificially decreased the foreclosure rate during the first half of 2014. The second half of 2014 saw the foreclosure rate increase in comparison to the first half of the year. “Also, as result of the 120-day prohibition, by the time many members now seriously attempt to cure their default, the deficiency has become so large that they cannot secure the necessary funds,” the article continues. “Thus, we predict the foreclosure rate during the first half of 2015 may be closer to the rate in 2013 than the rate in 2014.” What do you think of this? Are you […]

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Substitute Mindfulness for Multi-Tasking

3 tips for the workplace. By Romie Mushtaq, M.D. Google, eBay, Intel and General Mills offer classes on it. So do Harvard Business School, Ross School of Business and Claremont Graduate University, among other campuses. Mindfulness–being focused and fully present in the here and now–is not just a corporate trend, but a proven method for success, both for individuals and for businesses. Even if a company doesn’t make it part of the culture, employees and managers can substitute their multi-tasking habits with mindfulness to reduce stress and increase productivity. The result that you and your colleagues will notice is that you’re sharper, more efficient and more creative. Many scientific and medical studies have documented that practicing mindfulness, whether it’s simply taking deep breaths, or actually meditating or doing yoga, has been shown to alter the structure and function of the brain, which is what allows us to learn, acquire new abilities, and improve memory. Advances in neuroimaging techniques have taught us how these mindfulness-based techniques affect neuroplasticity, or the brain’s ability to change in function or structure based on new experience. Multi-tasking, on the other hand, depresses the brain’s memory and analytical functions, and reduces blood flow to the part […]

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Get a Good Strategy for Your CU

By Kelly Schmit Volunteers are expected to be involved in a credit union’s strategy development and prescribe a course into the future, John Oliver, president of Laurel Management Systems, Inc., told CUES’ Directors Conference attendees last month. But what is strategy, exactly? According to Oliver, it’s not financial and business planning, but understanding the needs of the marketplace and how your credit union will meet them. A strategy is the purpose or the message of your credit union—where your credit union is going and why, Oliver explained. “As volunteers, you are responsible for giving your employees and members a purpose to follow,” he said. “Be passionate about why your credit is here with a guiding principle, and make sure everyone knows their role. “We are a very over-banked society and you need to meet your market’s needs through strategic leadership—which involves the application of the most simple economic theory, the allocation of limited resources or ‘deciding what to do and not do,’” he explained. According to Oliver, strategy development starts with holding the current business model up to scrutiny: Understand your value proposition before you question its sustainability. Understand your culture. Research, research, research and base decisions on hard data. […]

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Creating a Culture of Innovation

Know why you do the things you do–and support staff in doing them. By Kelly Schmit As an employee of CUES, I really related to what former Trader Joe’s CEO Doug Rauch said during our Directors Conference in December. Two points from his presentation rang especially clear: 1) innovation is needed for a business to succeed, and 2) the right culture is needed for innovation to take place. About a year ago, CUES went through the rebranding process, a major change. We wanted to create a culture of innovation; put ideas into action; and deliver valuable events, products and services to our market. Rauch told all of us at Directors Conference: “To create a culture of innovation, you have to start with why you exist as a business. Often we know what we do and how we do it, but sometimes we forget why we do it; and the why is the most critical part. Great businesses don’t simply try to maximize their bottom line, but return to their purpose.” As part of its rebranding process, CUES took a hard look at its mission and vision statements (read them here), what we were and what we wanted to become. Building […]

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Apple Pay, EMV and Retailer Breach Prevention

Could these new developments have helped avoid the Target compromise? By Michelle Thornton Perhaps the most common security question asked about Apple Pay’s tokenization technology and EMV (“chip”) cards is whether they could have prevented the Target breach, the first anniversary of which the industry just marked during the 2014 holiday shopping season. The short answer is no, but let’s look at what these security technologies can do. EMV—which secures card-based transactions, using a specialized computer chip housed right in the plastic—couldn’t have prevented the breach itself. But it could have prevented compromised numbers from being used to create counterfeit cards. EMV cards are difficult to reproduce, so fraudsters typically don’t attempt it. Tokenization—which removes the credit card number from an online, mobile or contactless point-of-sale transaction and replaces it with a randomly generated number–couldn’t have prevented the breach, either. But any tokenized numbers would have been worthless to the fraudsters. Tokenized numbers (at least in Apple Pay) are tied to a specific device (aka phone). So if the fraudsters got the number and tried to use it, the transaction would fail because the unique elements of that device would not be present in the transaction. Behind the scenes, the […]

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Boost Service in 3 Areas in 2015

Checking without overdraft fees, card security and access to liquidity. By Bob Giltner Credit unions take great pride in their service to members, so it may be surprising to hear that many CUs are, unintentionally, underserving their members. Based on member demand, credit unions should be providing additional services in three areas: a checking account without overdraft fees, a secure debit card and easy online access to liquidity. No-Overdraft-Fee Checking Currently, few or no U.S. credit unions offer checking accounts without overdraft fees. Meanwhile, Wal-Mart, prepaid cards and neo-banks like Simple make a living by promoting checking accounts without such fees. Some argue all accounts have no overdraft fees if members just balance their checkbooks, and that overdraft services protect members from merchant return check charges. Yet such a perspective misses the changes in member needs and the marketplace. Millennials, those aged 18 to 35, now comprise the largest age segment in the nation, and they are clearly opting for non-bank payment providers, as shown in the recent Viacom report, “The Millennial Disruption Index,” which surveyed 10,000 people within this age group. Roughly three quarters of those surveyed felt better about transaction services with Amazon, Google, PayPal or Square than […]

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The Rise of the Multi-Screeners

Offering a consistent and personal experience across devices will increase CUs’ appeal. By Stephen Bohanon A Google study titled, “The New Multi-screen World: Understanding Cross-platform Consumer Behavior,” reported that “we are a nation of multi-screeners,” where the large majority (90 percent) of our media interactions are screen based. The report also indicated that consumers tend to either move from device to device or use multiple devices at the same time, moving seamlessly between them throughout the day. Managing finances is a top activity performed when consumers are sequentially screening between devices, according to the study. In fact, smartphones tend to be the most common starting place for banking activities (59 percent). Fifty-six percent then continue on through a PC or laptop, followed by 3 percent on a tablet. It is clear consumers are quickly changing the way they bank. According to Pew Research, device ownership continues to evolve with smartphones and tablets gaining. As of January 2014, over half (58 percent) of American adults owned a smartphone and 42 percent owned a tablet. Meanwhile, “dumb” phones are declining. Consequently, device usage is also evolving. Pew Research found that website visits through tablets and smartphones each increased by 50 percent in […]

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TILA-RESPA Deadline Countdown

CUs face big mortgage documentation decisions before Aug. 1, 2015. By John Levy The close of another year naturally causes most people to think about the year ahead. For our industry, it is a time to ponder such questions as, what will be the defining trends? What will be next year’s biggest stories? What do we face as our primary compliance challenges? This last question might be bringing most credit unions to a screeching halt. Not that managing burgeoning regulatory changes is anything new to today’s executives, but there are some fairly serious deadlines looming. Realize it or not, we are less than a year from the TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure Rule issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, with a go-live date of Aug. 1, 2015. The new rule is meant to make the information on mortgage disclosures easier for consumers to understand by consolidating forms required under the Truth in Lending Act and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, as well as eliminating miscellany data. The TILA-RESPA rule is meant to create a friendlier borrower atmosphere. For instance, two new documents—the loan estimate and the closing disclosure–will consolidate several other forms previously used, simplifying the consumer’s experience. Also, it […]

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How to Stay ‘Top of Wallet’ in the Apple Pay Era

Manage fraud risk, look at e-delivery and know how to serve Millennials. By Fredda McDonald Look back at 2014 for ideas on how to prepare for the new year to come: A year of high-profile data breaches kept security top of mind for consumers; the launch of Apple Pay and the looming 2015 EMV security-chip deadline defined payments; and both a digital payments revolution and a “Millennial shift” are well underway. Given these trends, how should credit unions prepare to stay competitive in 2015 and beyond? The Year of the Breach 2014 started with the effects of Target’s high-profile data breach being felt in full force, rocking consumer confidence to the core. That was followed by the Home Depot breach and a dozen more widespread fraud and security issues that dominated the conversation for much of 2014. These events increased the pressure on credit unions to be at the top of their game; they demand CUs lead the way in security. The good news is that credit unions are well-positioned to do so; they also recorded an all-time high in member satisfaction in 2014. More than ever before, it’s imperative that credit unions can play minute-by-minute defense for members, as […]

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Apple Pay and EMV Security

Tokenization and smart cards create a one-two punch to protect member transactions. By Michelle Thornton CUs are rightfully excited about the tokenization security process that underpins the much-talked-about Apple Pay. However, as CUs start to leverage tokenization, they can’t afford to ignore EMV (“chip”) cards, heralded as a huge leap in card security as they made a bigger foray into the U.S. market this year. In simple terms, tokenization enhances security on cardless transactions in mobile and online commerce, as well as at the contactless point of sale. (It does so by removing the credit card number from a transaction and replacing it with a randomly generated number.) In contrast, EMV secures card-based transactions, using a specialized computer chip housed right in the plastic. It’s possible to become confused because EMV and tokenization are often talked about in the same breath. They both use cryptography, and are both fraud prevention tools. As a result of the confusion, some credit unions might wonder if having tokenization makes having an EMV strategy and adoption irrelevant. It doesn’t. Each technology is brilliant at what it does. And each one is less brilliant at standing in for the other. In fact, choosing between tokenization […]

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Absolute Honesty

Six laws to promote a corporate culture of integrity. By Kelly Schmit Truer words have never been spoken… “Raise your hand if you have taught your children not to lie,” Larry Johnson asked the audience at CUES’ Directors Conference this week. Over 400 hands reached for the sky. “Raise your hand if you have ever told a lie,” followed up Johnson, co-author of Absolute Honesty: Building a Corporate Culture That Values Straight Talk and Rewards Integrity. Again, over 400 arms went into the air. So, where is the disconnect? How can we say one thing, but practice the complete opposite? More importantly, how can we build a corporate culture that values straight talk and rewards integrity when we are all less than stellar at always telling the truth? At Directors Conference, Johnson presented “Six Laws of Absolute Honesty.” Law #1: Tell the truth. We know everyone tells white lies from time to time. The problem is, individuals have different opinions about when the total truth should be told. When Johnson asked the audience, “What is your criteria for not telling a white lie?” several answers came back, including: if the consequence is worse than the lie if it is for […]

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Your ‘Campfire’ Story Counts

Know the power of the leader’s voice. By Michael Hudson, Ph.D. OK, I confess. During Tom Flick’s keynote presentation at last month’s CEO/Executive Team Network, I found myself daydreaming. Not exactly a desired behavior from one who would be leading a coaching session on the topic immediately following the speech, but it happened nonetheless. Here’s why… A former NFL quarterback turned motivational speaker, Flick spoke about the power of the leader’s voice–how words create pictures that create emotions that create attitudes that create behaviors that create habits that create reality. As he did so, my mind wandered to the time when I learned just what that meant—something I didn’t fully understand until hearing his insights. When I was 12 years old, my 4-H friends (finally) convinced me to attend state camp. They had tried for the previous couple of years, but frankly I didn’t get the appeal. Maybe that’s because my aunt and uncle lived at the camp year round and to me it was just a place that I went once in awhile to see family. So the idea of attending a full week of camp there certainly didn’t seem all that appealing. But that changed during the opening […]

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When Building a Sandcastle, You Can’t Beat the Ocean

Make sure you’re doing enough great work. By Michael Hudson, Ph.D. During his keynote presentation at CEO/Executive Team Network last month, Michael Bungay Stanier shared some very important and valuable ideas about work. Specifically, he challenged the audience to think about how much bad work, good work, and great work they were doing. Senior partner of Box of Crayons and author of Do More Great Work, Stanier reminded attendees that 90 percent of what we do is subconscious and that 50 percent is routine, and offered these key definitions: Bad Work — best depicted by the acronym WOMBAT—that is Waste Of Money, Bandwidth, And Time. Good Work — work within your job description that there is typically more of than you can actually do and that is fueled by false urgency (as if you are trying to beat the ocean while building a sandcastle). Great Work — working this category is about staying ahead of the curve. It is strategic, innovative and makes a difference. Using these definitions, Stanier challenged the audience to complete this very simple exercise: 1. Draw a large circle on a blank piece of paper. 2. Divide the circle into sections representing the percentage of time […]

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